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Archive for the ‘Emeritus Pope Benedict XVI’ Category

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Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI met Aug. 1 with Msgr. Livio Melina of the JPII Institute. Credit: Courtesy photo (Use restricted to CNA)

Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI met last week with a recently dismissed professor of moral theology at Rome’s Pontifical John Paul II Institute, amid ongoing controversy regarding recent changes to the Institute.

Source: Amid JPII Institute controversy, Benedict XVI meets with recently dismissed professor

BLOGGER’S NOTE:  I’m a little bothered by this move as well.

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LifeSiteNews

Published on Jun 18, 2019

Princess Gloria, one of the wealthiest women in Germany who is friends with not just Pope Benedict but also Hillary Clinton, joins John-Henry to discuss her Catholic faith, including her time spent away from the Church in the 1980s. “The Sacraments are the key to the well being of the soul,” she says in this truly unique episode of The John-Henry Westen Show. https://www.lifesitenews.com/blogs/vi…

SEE ALSO: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloria,_Princess_of_Thurn_and_Taxis

SEE ALSO: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert,_12th_Prince_of_Thurn_and_Taxis

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“The consequence for the Church’s life is that “we can only admit to ordination candidates who also possess the natural prerequisites, are intellectually and morally capable, and show the spiritual readiness to give themselves totally to the service of the Lord.”
“We can only turn away from false ways if we understand male and female sexuality as God’s gift, which does not serve narcissistic pleasure but has its true goal in the love between spouses and the responsibility for a family. Only in the wider context of Eros and Agape does sexuality have the power to build up the human person, the Church, and the state. Otherwise it brings about destruction.”
Seeing celibacy as the cause of sexual crimes against adolescents can only arise from a “materialist and atheistic point of view,” he said. “There is no proof for that; statistical data about sexual abuse say the opposite.”
Such an atheistic view is also found “in the arguments of those who blame abuse crimes on an invented ‘clericalism’ or on the sacramental structure of the Church.” He said that clerics are not mere “officials”, but are meant to minister to the people of God.
Seeing clerics as “power-fixated functionaries … is possible only in a secularized Church,” Müller concluded.
“Instead of surrounding ourselves with media consultants, and seeking help for the Church’s future from economic advisers, all of us … have to refocus on the origin and center of our faith: the triune God, the incarnation of Christ, the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, the closeness to God in the Holy Eucharist and in frequent Confession, daily prayer, and the readiness to be guided in our moral life by God’s grace. Nothing else provides the way out of the present crisis of faith and morals into a good future.”

Source: https://catholicherald.co.uk/news/2019/04/27/cardinal-muller-benedict-xvis-critics-are-ideologically-blinded/

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EWTN

Published on Apr 11, 2019

CARDINAL GERHARD MÜLLER, former prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith on Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI’s recent letter, “The Church and the Scandal of Sexual Abuse”.

ROBERT ROYAL, editor-in-chief of TheCatholicThing.org, and FR. GERALD MURRAY, canon lawyer and priest of the Archdiocese of New York join us for complete analysis of the Pope Emeritus’ document and the latest Catholic news.

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SPECIAL TO THE REGISTER
Pope Emeritus Benedict

EXCERT:  

“All this makes apparent just how fundamentally the authority of the Church in matters of morality is called into question. Those who deny the Church a final teaching competence in this area force her to remain silent precisely where the boundary between truth and lies is at stake.
Independently of this question, in many circles of moral theology the hypothesis was expounded that the Church does not and cannot have her own morality. The argument being that all moral hypotheses would also know parallels in other religions and therefore a Christian property of morality could not exist. But the question of the unique nature of a biblical morality is not answered by the fact that for every single sentence somewhere, a parallel can also be found in other religions. Rather, it is about the whole of biblical morality, which as such is new and different from its individual parts.
The moral doctrine of Holy Scripture has its uniqueness ultimately predicated in its cleaving to the image of God, in faith in the one God who showed himself in Jesus Christ and who lived as a human being. The Decalogue is an application of the biblical faith in God to human life. The image of God and morality belong together and thus result in the particular change of the Christian attitude towards the world and human life. Moreover, Christianity has been described from the beginning with the word hodós [Greek for a road, in the New Testament often used in the sense of a path of progress].
Faith is a journey and a way of life. In the old Church, the catechumenate was created as a habitat against an increasingly demoralized culture, in which the distinctive and fresh aspects of the Christian way of life were practiced and at the same time protected from the common way of life. I think that even today something like catechumenal communities are necessary so that Christian life can assert itself in its own way.”

“The Visitation that now took place brought no new insights, apparently because various powers had joined forces to conceal the true situation. A second Visitation was ordered and brought considerably more insights, but on the whole failed to achieve any outcomes. Nonetheless, since the 1970s the situation in seminaries has generally improved. And yet, only isolated cases of a new strengthening of priestly vocations came about as the overall situation had taken a different turn.
(2) The question of pedophilia, as I recall, did not become acute until the second half of the 1980s. In the meantime, it had already become a public issue in the U.S., such that the bishops in Rome sought help, since canon law, as it is written in the new (1983) Code, did not seem sufficient for taking the necessary measures.
Rome and the Roman canonists at first had difficulty with these concerns; in their opinion the temporary suspension from priestly office had to be sufficient to bring about purification and clarification. This could not be accepted by the American bishops, because the priests thus remained in the service of the bishop, and thereby could be taken to be [still] directly associated with him. Only slowly, a renewal and deepening of the deliberately loosely constructed criminal law of the new Code began to take shape.
In addition, however, there was a fundamental problem in the perception of criminal law. Only so-called guarantorism [a kind of procedural protectionism] was still regarded as “conciliar.” This means that above all the rights of the accused had to be guaranteed, to an extent that factually excluded any conviction at all. As a counterweight against the often-inadequate defense options available to accused theologians, their right to defense by way of guarantorism was extended to such an extent that convictions were hardly possible.
Allow me a brief excursus at this point. In light of the scale of pedophilic misconduct, a word of Jesus has again come to attention which says: “Whoever causes one of these little ones who believe in me to sin, it would be better for him if a great millstone were hung round his neck and he were thrown into the sea” (Mark 9:42).
The phrase “the little ones” in the language of Jesus means the common believers who can be confounded in their faith by the intellectual arrogance of those who think they are clever. So here Jesus protects the deposit of the faith with an emphatic threat of punishment to those who do it harm.
The modern use of the sentence is not in itself wrong, but it must not obscure the original meaning. In that meaning, it becomes clear, contrary to any guarantorism, that it is not only the right of the accused that is important and requires a guarantee. Great goods such as the Faith are equally important.
A balanced canon law that corresponds to the whole of Jesus’ message must therefore not only provide a guarantee for the accused, the respect for whom is a legal good. It must also protect the Faith, which is also an important legal asset. A properly formed canon law must therefore contain a double guarantee — legal protection of the accused, legal protection of the good at stake. If today one puts forward this inherently clear conception, one generally falls on deaf ears when it comes to the question of the protection of the Faith as a legal good. In the general awareness of the law, the Faith no longer appears to have the rank of a good requiring protection. This is an alarming situation which must be considered and taken seriously by the pastors of the Church.”

Essay in full of Benedict XVI: https://www.ncregister.com/daily-news/the-church-and-the-scandal-of-sexual-abuse

SEE ALSO ORIGINAL ARTICLE INTRODUCTING ESSAY HERE: http://www.ncregister.com/daily-news/pope-emeritus-benedict-speaks-up-on-the-current-sex-abuse-crisis

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“Cardinal Burke is convinced that the use of papal titles and of papal dress after a Pope has resigned is juridically and theologically problematic and does not help the faithful to understand the true sense what has happened — something he raised in the General Congregations just before the last Conclave. “Once you renounce the will to be the Vicar of Christ on earth, then you return to what you were before,” he said.”

But regarding the abdication itself, His Eminence said: “It seems clear to me that Benedict had his full mind and that he intended to resign the Petrine office.”  

Article: https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/did-benedict-really-resign-gaenswein-burke-and-brandmueller-weigh-in

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Published on Sep 20, 2018

Pope Benedict XVI resigned in 2013 and mystery has surrounded his disappearance from public life. Dr Taylor Marshall and Timothy Gordon continue their conversation about the resignation of Pope Benedict XVI in light of the Freemason infiltration of the Church going back to 1917 when St Maximilian Kolbe witnessed the Freemasons protesting the Catholic Church.

Visit Dr Marshall’s Catholic Crises Analysis Playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

Visit the Video Podcast of Dr Taylor Marshall Playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list…

Dr Taylor Marshall is the best-selling Catholic author of The Crucified Rabbi, The Eternal City, and Sword and Serpent. He produces weekly Youtube videos (usually published 12pm on Wednesdays). Please consider subscribing to receive future interviews and conversations.

Please explore Dr Marshall’s blog at taylormarshall.com and his 8 books at amazon.com: https://amzn.to/2MOZG3G

Timothy Gordon is the author Catholic Republic and it’s available at amazon.com: https://amzn.to/2QNXs7V

ALSO ON HIS PODCAST.

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